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Copyright, 1904, 

by 

The Malleable-Steel Range Manufacturing Co. 

South Bend, Ind. 




"The Malleable' 



Ran 




e 



For Family and Hotel Use 

Steam Tables, Carving Tables, Charcoal Broilers, Steam 

Jacket Kettles, Coffee, Tea and Hot Water Urns, 

and other Apparatus for the Hotel Kitchen 




1 ■>., ■> > 



■> » -> 



1 1 \ ' \ > 3 , > ' > » 5 » „ ' » 



The Malleable-Steel Range 
Manufacturing Company 

HARRY A.ENGMANJr.,Pm. IRVING A. SIBLEY, Vice-Pres. 
WM. L. KIZER, 6Vc. J. W00LVERT0N, 7Vm. 



South Bend, Indiana 



U. S. A. 






LIBRARY of CONGRESS 

Two Copies Received 
JUL 5 1904 
*l Cooyrlffht Entry 

LAS© ^t XXo. No. 

' COPY B 



X 






THE 

MHLE4ffi£ 



4* 





FIRE JILL YOUR 
MJJLLJILL YOUR 
IVS NON-B&EJ1K 
STEEL A "°MJILLE 



ILL 



Announcement 



THE MALLEABLE" Range was originally placed on the market in response 
to a demand for a range which should combine the sterling malleable 
construction with artistic finish and the best modern improvements. That 
we have succeeded in fully meeting this demand is evidenced by our rapidly increas- 
ing business. 

Good, persistent advertising is partly responsible for our success and for the 
success of those dealers who have handled our goods. An important feature of our 
advertising is the Exhibit System, which we have not space here to explain in detail, but 
which has proved wonderfully beneficial, both from an advertising and sales standpoint, 
for those of the trade who have energetically co-operated with us. At the same 
time, it is a fact that the best advertisement of our range is the range itself. 

There are still dealers whose knowledge of malleable goods is so limited 
that they continue to doubt whether malleable iron is as well suited for the purpose 
of range construction as is cast iron. To such we will only say that they are standing 
in their own light. Wherever malleable ranges are well known, the general public 
is already convinced that they are superior to all others, and it is good policy on the 
part of dealers to let their customers have what they want. 

We believe the time is not far distant when ranges of this construction will dis- 
place all others. They possess so many points of superiority to the ordinary sort that 
their ultimate general adoption may be accepted as a foregone conclusion. 

Many dealers handle cheap ranges simply because they do not credit their 
patrons wifh that intelligence which appreciates a high grade range. 

Every dealer realizes the difficulty of selling a range that is not attractive-look- 
ing. He may offer what is reputed to be the best-working and most durable range in 
existence, yet if the possible customer (usually a lady) is not pleased with its appear- 
ance, it will be very difficult to effect a sale. First impressions are all important and 



if the first impression is favorable — as it always is in the case of "The Malleable" — it 
is then easy to present the facts as to quality, durability, and practical efficiency in a 
manner that will both convince the customer and insure a sale. u The Malleable" 
appeals both to the artistic eye and to experienced common sense — to the first through 
its severely correct lines and elegant finish, and to the second by its easily demon- 
strated practical perfection. 

We have but one price, make no discount whatever for quantity, and do not sell 
to jobbers, catalogue houses, or consumers. Our fixed policy is to sell to but one 
dealer in any town, giving him sufficient territory to justify him in pushing our goods, 
and requiring and assisting him to maintain established retail prices. The wide-awake, 
up-to-date retailer is thus protected in his efforts to sell our goods on their merits, 
and can afford to take the time to fully explain their points of superiority to pro- 
spective customers, having the assurance that no competitor can offer similar articles 
at lower figures. 

The Malleable- Steel Range Mfg. Co. 

South Bend, Indiana. 



Construction and Material 

TO insure the perfect operation of a range, it is as essential that it should be air-tight as that a boiler 
should be water-tight. This result can be accomplished only by riveting every joint in the entire 
construction. Malleable iron possesses such strength and tenacity as permits the driving of every 
joint to the point of air-tightness, Norway iron rivets being used. Our range is built of heavy three-pass, 
cold-rolled, double-stretched steel plates and smooth, thoroughly annealed malleable iron, literally 
welded into an air-tight form. The range bodies are of No. 16 gauge Wellsville polished steel plates. 
The frames, doors, lids, anchor plates, tops, dampers and handles are of malleable iron, which admits 
of riveting throughout and insures against liability to fire-cracks in the doors, frames and ovens. 

Expansion and contraction, if nothing else, will soon crack any range having a frame and top of 
cast-iron. It is at best a temporary affair. The cheapness of cast-iron is its only recommendation. The 
malleable iron alone in our range costs more than the entire material of an ordinary cast-iron range. 
But the malleable iron in our range minimizes the repair bill and lasts a lifetime. It also causes an 
equal and perfect distribution of heat, and retains it to a remarkable degree. 

Workmanship 

We employ none but experienced range workers on our product — men who are thoroughly 
skilled in their trade and who do nothing but build ranges from one year's end to the other. By them 
all the drafts are carefully adjusted, and the fitting points accurately brought together, so as to prevent 
the leakage of air. 

Every range is submitted to three rigid inspections before leaving our plant. 

Finish 

It has been said that a malleable and steel range could not be made as attractive in appearance 
as the old-fashioned cast-iron and steel range, with its meaningless and inartistic superfluity of cast- 
iron convolutions and ornamentation. It must be admitted that the earliest patterns of malleable 
ranges were not particularly pleasing in design, but that is a thing of the past. By the process of evo- 
lution, the original lines have been gradually modified until they have now attained a perfection of form 
which the most critical must admit leaves nothing to be desired. Through the adoption of Wellsville 
polished steel for the body, we have added wonderfully to the finish of our range. It makes the most 
durable, practical and beautiful finish, and does away with the asphaltum or Japan finish formerly em- 
ployed, which after a few months' actual use became sticky and unsightly. The occasional application 
of a cloth to the polished steel body causes it to appear clean and bright, in all the beauty of its original 
blue luster. 

All doors, panels and angle irons are handsomely nickeled. Frames, bands and hinges are 
aluminum-finished, which not only presents a handsome appearance, but prevents the surface from 
rusting. This finish will not burn off like asphaltum, and can be cleaned with soap and water. 

In finish, our range is a strictly high-grade product, and that fact should be borne in mind when 
comparing our prices with those of other manufacturers. 

Design 

Our range is notable for its symmetry of design and for its plain yet rich ornamentation. Its 
smoothess makes it easy to keep clean. 

Tops 

The tops are made in sectional parts, of malleable iron. Their surface is so smooth that polish- 
ing is unnecessary ; but we supply them polished, when desired, at a small additional charge. 



Ash -Pan 

The ash-pan is made in one piece, of very heavy steel plate, and is riveted to the nickeled malle- 
able front. It is fortified with a bail running across its center, and is handled with an ash-pan hook 
that never gets hot. It is provided with a hearth, which prevents ashes from being dropped on the 
floor when the ash-pan is withdrawn. The ash-pit is exceptionally large. (See sectional view on page 13.) 

End -Draft 

The small front draft generally used on ranges is not sufficient under some conditions ; and we 
have, therefore, added what is known as the engine- or end-draft to our range. This insures the equal 
combustion of fuel from end to end of the fire-box. 

Lower Warming Closet 

This part of our range, being air-tight, does not dry up food placed therein to be kept warm. 

Top Warming Closet 

This closet is large and roomy. It has drop doors on which dishes may be placed, and which 
when not in use can be closed up out of the way. The drop door is a great improvement over the roll- 
top shelf, because it affords more room for shelf purposes, besides being much more cleanly. Roll-top 
shelves are so constructed that it is impossible to prevent the accumulation of grease and other matter 
on the inside top surface, while the drop door is entirely free from this objectionable feature. 

Shelf 

The shelf is supported by open nickeled brackets, and equipped with handsome nickeled 
tea-shelves. 

Oven Door Handle and Catch 

The handle is made with a double catch, and with no spring about it to get out of repair. The 
catches have a second notch, so that the oven door can be left open for cooling or ventilation. 

The handle is set out from the range in such a manner that it does not become so hot as oven 
door handles usually do. The oven door can be let down or raised without the hand coming in contact 
with anything except the handle of the catch. 

Nickel Steel Tube Front Rail 

This rail is formed of seamless tubing, handsomely nickeled, and extends the full length of the 
range, being supported by substantial malleable end-brackets. It can be used as a towel rail, and 
affords protection against contact with the top plates. 

Clean -Out Door 

The door is so placed that the ash-pan can be put into the lower warming closet, and the soot 
can then be easily removed with a scraper and deposited in the ash-pan, as all the dirt falls directly 
into it. The clean-out door is hinged and closely fitted, and will not work loose. 



8 



Malleable Back Flue 

A MALLEABLE iron shoe is closely fitted and riveted to the bottom of the steel back-flue at the 
point where creosote and condensation is liable to accumulate and eat out an ordinary steel back- 
flue. This renders this point impervious to the action of the creosote. As the flue bottom is also 
liable to the destructive action of creosote, we make it of No. 18 gauge steel, being heavier than any 
other flue bottom on the market, and sufficiently heavy to be practically indestructible. 

Oven 

The oven is the very heart of the range — its most vital part. 
The first essential in an oven is that it be air-tight; otherwise it is 
impossible to get satisfactory results. Our ovens are made of 
No. 10 and No. 12 gauge steel, hand-riveted to malleable iron 
angle-frames, and the frames are riveted to the range body. 
With these frames, the lining cannot warp and the door cannot 
get out of plumb. 

In the twenty-inch oven, double No. 10 steel is used for the 
bottom plate, which prevents buckling or warping. On smaller 
ovens this tendency is sufficiently overcome by using single No. 10 
bottom plates. 

The oven in an ordinary range is attached to the range body, 
without frames or bracing, by simply forming an angle of the 
lining itself. 

By riveting all oven plates to malleable frames, we get an 
absolutely air-tight oven that will not admit the gases formed in 
the fire-box. Neither will our oven ever fire-crack, nor can ashes 
leak into it ; and it is therefore always clean, pure and dry. 

An oven made of steel is acknowledged even by manufacturers of cast-iron ranges to possess 50% 
greater baking capacity than a cast-iron oven, while requiring much less fuel. It is also a well-known 
fact that a poor cook stove will destroy a great deal of food through defective baking. Have you ever 
tried to figure out what that would mean in one year ? For the sake of illustration, let us say that a 
good range will save ten cents per day. In one year this would amount to a saving of $36.50, as com- 
pared with the operation of an inferior range. In ten years the saving would amount to $365, being 
many times the original cost of the range. 

All our ovens are aluminized. 





Steel Angle Corners 



These corner-pieces are handsomely nickeled, and are 
placed on the front corners of all ranges, strengthening the con- 
struction and adding to the symmetry of design. 



Asbestos Lining 



There are three kinds of material used in forming the 
wall in all our ranges. The outer surface is composed of a 
sheet of polished steel. It makes the most beautiful, durable and 
practical finish possible for a range. The inner face of the wall 
is heavy cold-rolled steel. Between these two steel plates 



is an interlining of asbestos mill-board. This asbestos board is very heavy, and being a perfect non- 
conductor, it prevents the escape of heat through the wall and concentrates it upon the oven, thus 
securing the full benefit of the fuel consumed. Asbestos interlining is absolutely indispensable in an 
air-tight construction. Being covered on both sides by steel plates, the asbestos cannot wear or be 
scraped off, and it therefore lasts as long as the range itself. The end flue and top flue over the oven 
are also covered with asbestos. By the use of asbestos interlining, and by riveting the malleable top 
plates to the body of the range, the leakage of cold air into and the escape of hot air out of the range 
are alike rendered impossible. The air-tight construction thus formed saves labor and insures the 
maximum of results from the fuel used, and the fire never requires to be forced. 

Fire- Box 



The weakest point in most ranges is the fire-box. In " The Malleable " this is one of the strongest 
features. Disposed around our fire-box is over one hundred pounds of the very best gray iron. The back 
lining alone weighs thirty-six pounds. It is made in four sections, a single one of which weighs as much 
as the entire lining on an ordinary stove or range. Behind the linings 
are air chambers, which prevent excessive heating of the linings, greatly 
increasing their life as compared with what is usual in other ranges. 

The size of the fire-box in our range has been determined by 
exhaustive tests, designed to ascertain the precise size that would by its 
smallness be most economical of fuel while yet large enough to operate 
the range satisfactorily. In other words, the fire-box is exactly and 
correctly proportioned for the work it has to do. 

The pouch feed lining is in three sections, to allow for contraction 

and expansion. It is the only sectional pouch feed lining on the market. 

We can supply a lining specially designed for use with wood fuel, 

in which case the fire-box is three inches longer than when intended 

for coal. 

No. 8 No. 9 

Size of fire-box for coal . . i8"xq"x7" 2o"x9"x7" 

" wood. . 2i"x9"x7" 23"x9"x7" 

Grease or garbage should never be thrown into the pouch feed or 
burned in the fire-box, as nothing destroys the texture and life of iron 
so quickly as the burning of grease or watery waste. 

Any fuel, from corncobs to hard coal, can be used with the pouch 
feed. The pouch feed is also convenient for toasting and broiling. 

When properly used — and not abused — our fire-box will last 
indefinitely. 

Duplex or Combination Grate 

The highest degree of perfection has been attained in this 
grate, which is the only one on the market that operates equally 
well with either hard coal, soft coal, or wood. By one turn of the 
shaker to the right or left the grate can be adjusted for either fuel. 
This grate revolves from its center, and a slight rotary motion 
with the shaker removes the ashes and clinkers without dumping 
the fire. The gear that controls this motion has two small cog 
wheels meshed together outside of the fire-box. In this position 
they cannot become clogged with ashes or affected by the heat. 
These cogs are covered by a handsome nickeled housing, which 
protects them from disarrangement while leaving them easily 
accessible for adjustment. 

This grate is adapted for burning anything, from corncobs 
or chips to hard coal or natural gas. 



10 






Portable Flush Reservoir 
Capacity 15 Gallons 



Flush Reservoir 

Realizing the preference of the majority of housewives for the flush 
reservoir, our first effort in connection with the production of " The Malle- 
able " was to build a flush reservoir that would hold as much water as an 
elevated reservoir, and which could at the same time be heated efficiently. 
We have not only succeeded in doing this, but we have also produced a 
reservoir that heats equally well with any kind of fuel. In that particular 
it is superior to all other reservoirs. 

The flush reservoir is heated by means of a copper pocket, which is 
in contact with a steel pocket with malleable frame located in the right- 
hand end of the range, and which constantly supplies an abundance of hot 
water. Flush reservoirs are generally controlled by a damper, which when 
open directs toward the reservoir the heat intended 
for the oven, thus rendering the oven ineffective 
while water is being heated. The construction 
of our flush reservoir is such that both oven and 
reservoir are heated at the same time. 




Elevated Reservoir 
.Capacity 15 Gallons 



As flame does not come into direct contact 
with the reservoir, it is not liable to be destroyed by creosote. It is made of 
very heavy copper, and encased in handsome nickeled and aluminized brack- 
ets. Being portable, it is easily kept clean. The flush reservoir is specially 
fitted to each range, and numbered, and should be set up accordingly. 

Elevated Reservoir 

This reservoir is heated by means of a copper pocket which is in con- 
tact with a gray-iron pocket located in the fire-box end of the range. It is 
made of heavy planished and nickeled copper, with copper-lined, planished 
steel top, upon which vessels can be set without injuring the surface. 

We can furnish this reservoir, if desired, for any size family range ; but 

as this style of reservoir has become practically 
obsolete, owing to the popularity of the flush reser- 
voir, we do not illustrate it as connected to the 
various sizes and styles of ranges upon which it 
can be furnished. 



Left End Flush Reservoir 

This reservoir is heated by copper pocket in contact with gray iron 
pocket in fire-box end of range; made of heavy copper encased in hand- 
some nickeled and alumined brackets. We can furnish this reservoir on all 
size family ranges, but do not so illus- 
trate because it is by no means as 
popular as the regular flush reservoir 
owing to its small capacity and loca- 
tion. 




Left End Flush Reservoir 
Capacity 10 Gallons 



Gas Attachment 

Gas attachment for family range connected to left end of 
range convenient for quick boiling, heating, frying, etc. With 
patent oven can also be used for baking. 



11 




L.ifC. 



About Malleable Iron 



MALLEABLE iron has been universally adopted by railroads for car castings, by agricultural 
implement manufacturers for machines, and is surely and rapidly growing in favor for range 
construction. This is most natural, as it is the only material of which a perfect cooking apparatus 
can be made. The time is coming when the public will have nothing else. It is inevitable, as this con- 
struction is the most practicable and enduring. 

Manufacturers of cast-iron stoves and ranges have fought malleable construction and endeavored 
to belittle its real merit because of the great expense it would mean to them to adopt it, by reason of 
the change of patterns this would involve and the great additional outlay necessary to equip a malleable 
foundry. They have failed, however, in their efforts to create prejudice against it, as users of our con- 
struction have been so loud in its praise that it has brought conviction to all practical people who have 
examined it, and is being rapidly adopted everywhere that it is known. 

Malleable iron is the very highest grade of gray iron, submitted after casting to a process of 
annealing which continues over sixteen days, and by which all impurities are eliminated from the iron, 
rendering it less porous and of greater tensile strength than any other iron. The carbon which makes 
cast iron so brittle is burned out, leaving the pure iron, which can be stretched, doubled, hammered and 
twisted without breaking, because it is so tough. These castings are placed in immense sealed ovens 
and submitted to great heat for nine days, then allowed to gradually cool down until they can be 
handled, when the ovens are unsealed and the castings removed. Upon careful examination all castings 
considered good are accepted. The defective ones are rejected and become a total loss, as nothing but 
perfect castings will be embodied in our construction. The percentage of rejected castings varies 
greatly, at times whole ovens being unfit to use, and at other times all being acceptable. The most 
expert malleable workers have never been able to explain this condition, nor has a process been discov- 
ered by which castings can be annealed without a loss of many castings. 

During the process of annealing, the original shape of castings is almost entirely lost, and in order 
to restore it immense drop hammers are used, in those cases — and they are numerous — where dies 
cannot be used to restore the original shape, it is necessary to do the work by hand. 

It is a strange and interesting sight for one not familiar with our construction to see the way in 
which we hammer and bang our top plates, anchor plates, frames and doors into fitting shape. A blow 
with a fraction of the force used on our material would send cast iron ringing into a thousand pieces, 
because cast iron is so brittle. 

What observing dealer or user of a cook stove has not at some time discovered stray bolts and 
nuts from the interior of his cook stove ? These bolts or nuts were intended to hold some joint, perhaps 
an air-tight joint. Time, or a jolt, has worked them loose, permitting gases, soot, ashes, etc., to spoil 
the food and handicap the rapid and satisfactory operation of the stove. 

Our castings, being malleable iron, admit of the severest working. We, therefore, hand-rivet 
" The Malleable" throughout with the best Norway rivets, which absolutely insures air-tight construc- 
tion, thus saving time, fuel and food, and giving evenness of temperature and the right distribution of 
heat, advantages which are made possible only by using malleable iron. 

Expansion and contraction, if nothing else, will soon crack a range with cast iron frames and top. 
It is, at best, a temporary affair. The cost of producing cast iron is comparatively little. The malle- 
able iron alone in our range costs more than the entire material of an ordinary steel range. Malleable 
iron in cooking apparatus minimizes the repair bill, lasts a lifetime, and gives and maintains an equal 
and perfect distribution of heat. 



12 




Sectional View of Family Range. 



Square Range with Low Back 



State whether range is wanted with or without Pouch Feed. 





No. 
Holes 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Wei 


ght 


CODE WORD 


Size 


Without 
Pouch Feed 


With 
Pouch Feed 


816 


6—8" 


34^x28^ 


i6x2i^x 


13 


405 


lbs. 


Knee 


Pro Knee 


816 


*4— 8" 


34><x28^ 


16x21^ x 


13 


405 


lbs. 


Kirk 


Pro Kirk 


818 


6—8" 


36^ X28^ 


i8x 21^ x 


13 


415 


lbs. 


King- 


Pro King 


818 


*4— 8" 


36^ x28>^ 


i8x 21% x 


13 


415 


lbs. 


Knob 


Pro Knob 


820 


6— 8" 


38 X28>^ 


20 X 21^ X 


13 


435 


lbs. 


Kilt 


Pro Kilt 


916 


t4-9* 


34^x30^ 


16 x 23^ X 


13 


425 


lbs. 


Kite 


Pro Kite 


918 


6— 9" 


36^x30% 


r8x 23^ x 


13 


445 


lbs. 


Kid 


Pro Kid 


918 


*4— 8" 


36^x30^ 


18 x 23^ X 


13 


445 


lbs. 


Knat 


Pro Knat 


920 


6—9" 


38 x30^ 


20 x 23^ X 


13 


465 


lbs. 


Kelp 


Pro Kelp 



*And French Plate, f And Key Plate. 

This range can be furnished with water front if required. Code word for range with Water Front 
is "full" following the regular code word. 



Never burn grease or garbage in the fire- 
box, as nothing destroys the texture and 
life of iron so quickly as the burning of 
grease or watery waste. 



14 



Flush Reservoir Range with Low Back 



State whether range is wanted with or without Pouch Feed. 





No. 
Holes 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Weight 


CODE WORD 


Size 


Without 
Pouch Feed 


With 
Pouch Feed 


816 


6—8" 


34X x28^ 


l6x2I^ 


X 


13 


470 lbs. 


Mute 


Pro Mute 


816 


*4— 8" 


34^x28^ 


i6x 215^ 


X 


13 


470 lbs. 


Mart 


Pro Mart 


818 


6—8" 


36^ X28^ 


i8x 21^ 


X 


13 


490 lbs. 


Mate 


Pro Mate 


818 


*4-8" 


16% x2$y 2 


i8x 21 j£ 


X 


13 


490 lbs. 


Mud 


Pro Mud 


820 


6-8" 


38 X28>^ 


20X21*^ 


X 


13 


510 lbs. 


Mast 


Pro Mast 


916 


t4-9" 


■34^x30^ 


16 x 233^ 


X 


13 


500 lbs. 


Meal 


Pro Meal 


918 


6 — 9" 


36^x30^ 


18x2314 


X 


13 


520 lbs. 


Muse 


Pro Muse 


918 


*4-9" 


36^x30^ 


18x2314 


X 


13 


520 lbs. 


Milk 


Pro Milk 


920 


6—9" 


38 x30^ 


20 X 23 ^ 


X 


13 


540 lbs. 


Mole 


Pro Mole 



*And French Plate. | And Ke Y Plate. 

This range can be furnished with water front if required. Code word for range with Water Front 
is "Full," following the regular code word. 

Flush Reservoir is carefully fitted to each range, and numbered. Must be set up accordingly. 



If desired, family ranges will be furnished 
with reducing rings and lid for one hole, 
making size of hole from 9 or 8 inches to 
5 inches diameter. 



16 



Square Range with High Shelf 



State whether range is wanted with or without Pouch Feed. 





No. 
Holes 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Weight 


CODE WORD 


Size 


Without 
Pouch Feed 


With 
Pouch Feed 


816 
816 
818 
818 

820 
916 
918 
918 
920 


6—8" 
*4— 8" 

6—8" 
*4-8" 

6—8" 

t4-9" 
6—9" 

* 4 — 9" 
6—9" 


34^X28^ 

34^x28}^ 
36^x28^ 
36^ x28^ 

38 X28^ 

343<x30^ 
36^x30^ 
36^x30^ 
38 x30^ 


16 x 215^ x 13 
i6x 21% x 13 
18 x 21% x 13 
i8x 21^ x 13 
20 x 215^ x 13 
i6x 23^ x 13 
i8x 23^ x 13 
18 x 23^ x 13 

20x231^x13 


415 lbs. 
415 lbs. 
435 lbs. 
435 lbs. 
455 lbs. 
445 lbs. 
465 lbs. 
465 lbs. 
485 lbs. 


Rule 

Rag 

Run 

Root 

Rock 

Rain 

Reed 

Rope 

Race 


Pro Rule 
Pro Rag 
Pro Run 
Pro Root 
Pro Rock 
Pro Rain 
Pro Reed 
Pro Rope 
Pro Race 



* And French Plate. | And Ke Y Plate. 

This range can be furnished with water front if required. Code word for range with Water Front 
is "Full," following the regular code word. 



All family ranges have a seven-inch pipe. 
Do not reduce it. All ranges should be 
set on a piece of zinc or other metal to 
protect the floor. 



18 



Flush Reservoir Range with High Shelf 



State whether range is wanted with or without Pouch Feed. 





No. 
Holes 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Weight 


CODE WORD 


Size 


Without 
Pouch Feed 


With 
Pouch Feed 


816 
816 
818 
818 
820 
916 
918 
918 
920 


6—8" 
*4— 8" 

6-8" 
*4— 8" 

6—8" 

t 4 -9 ,/ 
6—9" 

*4— 9" 

6—9" 


34^X28^ 

34^ x 28% 
36^x28^ 
36^x28^ 
38 X28>^ 
34^fx30^ 
36^x30^ 
36^x30^ 
38 x30^ 


l6 X 2\% X I3 
l6 X 21^ X 13 

i8x 21^ x 13 
i8x 21% x 13 

20X21^X13 

i6x 23^ x 13 
18x23^ x 13 
i8x 23% x 13 
20 x 23^ x 13 


495 lbs. 
495 lbs - 
510 lbs. 
510 lbs. 
530 lbs. 
520 lbs. 
540 lbs. 
540 lbs. 
560 lbs. 


Post 

Pail 

Pan 

Peck 

Park 

Pear 

Pelt 

Pad 

Pond 


Pro Post 
Pro Pail 
Pro Pan 
Pro Peck 
Pro Park 
Pro Pear 
Pro Pelt 
Pro Pad 
Pro Pond 



* And French Plate. | And Ke Y Plate. 

This range can be furnished with water front if required. Code word for range with Water Front 
is "Full," following the regular code word. 

Flush reservoir is carefully fitted to each range, and numbered. Must be set up accordingly. 



The pouch feed lining is in three sec- 
tions, to allow for contraction and expan- 
sion. This is the only sectional pouch 
feed lining on the market. 



20 



Square Range with High Closet 



State whether range is wanted with or without Pouch Feed. 





No. 

Holes 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Weight 


CODEWORD 


Size 


Without 
Pouch Feed 


With 
Pouch Feed 


816 
816 
818 

818 
820 
916 
918 
918 
920 


6—8" 
*4— 8" 

6—8" 
*4— 8" 

6—8" 

t4-9" 
6-9" 

*4-9" 

6—9" 


34^X28^ 
34^X28^ 
36^X28^ 
36X X28^ 
38 X28>^ 

34^x30^ 
36^x30^ 
36^x30^ 

38 x 30^2 


16x21^ x 13 
i6x 21 % x 13 
i8x 2i^ x 13 

18x21^ x 13 

20X2IJ{ X 13 

16 x 23^ x 13 
i8x 23^ x 13 
i8x 23^ x 13 
20 x 23^ x 13 


450 lbs. 
450 lbs. 
465 lbs. 
465 lbs 
485 lbs. 

475 ] bs. 
495 lbs. 

495 lbs. 
520 lbs. 


Nest 
Nook 

Nut 

Nile 

Nail 

Nag 

Nose 

Noun 

Nick 


Pro Nest 
Pro Nook 
Pro Nut 
Pro Nile 
Pro Nail 
Pro Nag 
Pro Nose 
Pro Noun 
Pro Nick 



* And French Plate, t And Key Plate. 

This range can be furnished with water front if required. Code word for range with Water Front 
is " Full " following the regular code word. 



If desired, our ranges will be furnished 
with reducing rings and lid for one hole, 
making size of hole from 9 or 8 inches to 
5 inches diameter. 



22 



Flush Reservoir Range with High Closet 



State whether range is wanted with or without Pouch Feed. 





No. 
Holes 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Weight 


CODE WORD 


Size 


Without 
Pouch Feed 


With 
Pouch Feed 


816 


6— 8" 


34^X28^ 


16 x 21 34^ 


X 


13 


520 lbs. 


Tusk 


Pro Tusk 


816 


*4— 8" 


34^X28^ 


l6x2I^ 


X 


13 


520 lbs. 


Till 


Pro Till 


818 


6—8" 


36^ X28^ 


l8 X2I^ 


X 


13 


540 lbs. 


Tent 


Pro Tent 


818 


*4— 8" 


36^ X28^ 


l8x2I^ 


X 


13 


540 lbs. 


Top 


Pro Top 


820 


6—8" 


38 X28>^ 


20 X 21 % 


X 


13 


560 lbs. 


Tray 


Pro Tray 


916 


t4-9 ,/ 


34^x30% 


16 x 23^ 


X 


13 


550 lbs. 


Tack 


Pro Tack 


918 


6— 9" 


36^x30^ 


I8X23X 


X 


13 


570 lbs. 


Trot 


Pro Trot 


918 


*4— 9" 


36^x30^ 


18X23^ 


X 


13 


570 lbs. 


Trip 


Pro Trip 


920 


6— 9" 


38 x30^ 


20X23^ 


X 


13 


590 lbs. 


Tape 


Pro Tape 



* And French Plate. | And Key Plate. 

This range can be furnished with water front if required. Code word for range with Water Fron 
is " full," following the regular code word. 

Flush reservoir is carefully fitted to each range, and numbered. Must be set up accordingly. 



All family ranges have a seven-inch pipe. 
Do not reduce it. All ranges should be 
set on a piece of zinc or other metal to 
protect the floor. 



24 



Water - Front 




OUR water-front occupies the entire left side of the fire-box. It is made of malleable iron, and the 
walls are very much thinner than it is possible to make them in a water-front of cast-iron — the 
kind ordinarily used in other ranges. On account of the thinness of the walls of our water-front, 
it holds a larger amount of water than others ; and for the same reason, the water heats very much 
more rapidly than it does in a cast-iron water-front. All our water-fronts are tested up to 250 pounds 

pressure to the square inch, and will not leak 
except under a still greater pressure. On 
account of their malleable construction and of 
the high pressure to which they are subjected 
before leaving our factory, it is manifest that 
they will stand the test of ordinary use without 
disclosing any weakness or defect. 

A water-front may become defective through 
freezing, or through fire being started when the 
water-front is empty. Care should, therefore, 
be exercised against these contingencies. 

Cut A illustrates our pin water-front. With 
this water-front we can heat fully double 
the amount of water that can be heated with 
any other water-front. The pins at the top of 
the water-front are hollow and extend out over 
the fire, thus gaining much additional radiating 
surface while not in the least extent reducing 
the size of the fire-box. 

Cut B illustrates our plain malleable 
water-front. We recommend this water-front 
for hard coal, or where a very small boiler is 
used, or where a pin water-front heats the 
water too rapidly. 

Cut C illustrates our pouch feed water- 
front, which is "L" shaped, and replaces the 
lining of the left side and back end. It affords 
an abundant hot water supply where the pouch 
feed is used. 






26 




Pressure Boiler and Flush Reservoir 

Which make a most successful combination range when both hard and soft water are used. In 
this combination you do not have to resort to pipe connections to reservoir, thus avoiding the attendant 
annoyances — filling up, burning out and freezing. 

Flush reservoir on right-hand end of range is heated by direct contact with the hot air as it 
passes around oven. 

Flush reservoirs are the popular construction. This one is a great success. We strongly recom- 
mend it. 

27 



Directions for Pressure Boiler Connections 

FOR the benefit of those who are not familiar with the proper use of water-backs and the manner of 
connecting them to pressure or open boilers, and to enable such persons to guard against a burn- 
ing out and bursting or cracking of water-backs, we give the following directions : 

The cold water enters the pressure boiler at the top, and a tube in the boiler carries it to a point 
near the bottom. The water then passes through the lower pipe into the malleable iron water-front in 
the fire-box of the range, filling the pin extensions, where it is rapidly heated, and then passes through 
the upper pipe into the boiler. The pressure caused by the weight of the water in the tank will force 
the hot water to any point not higher than the surface of the water in the tank. The pressure also 
forces the cold water through the pipes to any point not higher than the surface of the water in the tank. 

The pipe from the cold water supply to the boiler need not necessarily go straight down. This 
pipe should be firmly attached and not allowed to sag; and where the pipe leaves the range to go to 
the boiler, it is essential that it should incline upward. 

It is absolutely necessary that the water should be turned on and that the water-front and boiler 
should be full of water before a fire is made in the range, and it is important that the pipes should be 
protected against freezing. 

The water-fronts are tapped for one-inch pipe. In order to get the best service, connections 
should all be of that size, with angles no greater than 45 degrees. 

In all cases there should be a waste pipe and cock under the boiler, to be used for cleaning both 
heater and boiler, and the cock should be opened at least once every two weeks. 

Lime deposits should be removed occasionally by taking out the water-back, filling it with a 
strong solution of concentrated lye, and allowing it to stand until the lime is softened. The lime can 
then be jarred from the iron with a hammer. Mud is nearly as injurious to water-backs as lime, but is 
more easily removed, it being ordinarily not necessary to displace the water-heater in order to clean it. 
When the range is cold, open the waste pipe and allow water to pass through all parts freely, washing 
out the deposits thoroughly. In some localities, where the water contains much sediment, this should 
be attended to every week or two. 

Do not start fire when the water in pipes or heater is frozen ; it is hazardous both to life and 
property. In extremely cold weather, especially if the pipes are not protected, it is well to keep the 
water running and to keep fire in the range. 

Never start a fire unless there is water in the heater. 

If our malleable water-front should burst, it indicates either that the connections were wrong, or 
that the connecting pipes were filled with lime or mud, or that the water in the pipes was frozen, or 
that there was no water in the heater when the fire was started. For such conditions we are not respon- 
sible, and when a water-front bursts from such causes we will not replace it without charge. 



28 



HOT 'WATER 

EXIT 



COLO WATER 
r£NTRANCE 




Pressure Boiler 



Connected to range by pipes and water-front which can be furnished on all ranges when so 
specified. 

This style of range is very popular for use in city flats. Being practically indestructible, it is 
highly appreciated by landlords. 

One water-front fits all ranges. 

We advise plain water-front for hard coal. Pin water-front for wood or soft coal. 

Code word for water-front ordered in range is "Full," following the regular code word. 

29 




Laundry Stove No. 300 

Code Word : Judge. Weight 200 lbs. 

For hard or soft coal or wood. 

So constructed that face of iron is directly applied to fire lining, where heat is most intense, thus 
heating irons more rapidly and with much less fuel than any other laundry stove. 

Capacity, eight irons on side and four on top. 

Any wash boiler with eight-inch bottom can be used on top. 

The two side linings can be replaced with water fronts, making an excellent water heater. 



30 



"The Greatest Malleable" 

Combination Coal and Gas Range 

WHEREVER gas and coal ranges are used separately, a change to our combination coal and gas 
range is a most happy one. It occupies but little more space in the kitchen than an ordinary 
stove, and saves the expense of maintaining two cooking ranges. Dirt cannot accumulate in the 
space which exists between ranges when two ranges are used separately; and the annoyance of changing 
ranges as the seasons change is avoided. 

In our combination, gas can be used in summer and coal in winter, or both can be used in 
combination. There is not a day in the year when the gas part may not be used for some purpose. 

Cooking can be done for one or two persons on a single gas burner; or, should the occasion 
suddenly demand, both parts can be used, and cooking for thirty or forty persons can then be done 
with ease. 

Either the coal or gas part can be operated independently of the other, or both can be operated 
together. 

The water front can be connected so as to supply hot water when either part is in operation. Our 
combination, however, can be ordered with water front in either gas or coal section, or entirely without 
water fronts. 

The gas part can be attached in construction to either right or left side of coal range, thus enabling 
purchasers to get the arrangement most desired for convenience or room. Can be furnished with side 
valves when so ordered. 

In no particular do we make our gas section inferior to our coal section. It is of the same 
malleable and hand riveted construction, the same gauges of steel being used, the oven doors being 
hinged in the same manner, and being in every particular up to the high standard of our coal and wood 
ranges. Nothing is spared to make "The Malleable Combination" the crowning feature of range- 
building, and a demonstration of its convenience, economy, utility and durability in use is most con- 
vincing, as "The Malleable" appears to best advantage in actual operation. 



31 



Combination Range 



For coal and gas, or wood and gas. Made in two sizes. 

For artificial or natural gas. In ordering, specify kind of gas used as fuel, and give local pressure. 



Size 


Holes 

on 

Coal 

Section 


Entire 
Length 

of 
Range 


Width 

of 
Top 


Oven of 
Coal Range 


Main Oven of 
Gas Range 


Lower Oven of 
Gas Range 


Upper Broiling 
Oven of Gas Range 


*82oG 
f8i8G 


6-8" 
6-8" 


60^" 
58^" 


29" 
29" 


20 X 21/ie X 13 

1 8 x 2 1 %, x 13 


18 X 21/fe X 13 
18 X 21% X 13 


18 X 21% X 8 
18 X 21/le X 8 


l6}4 X II X I0^( 
16^ X II X 10^ 



* Weight, 875 lbs. | Weight, 850 lbs. 

All gas connections are 1 inch pipe. Don't reduce them or make acute angles in connecting. 

The gas range has three single burners, one double burner, twin oven burners and needle lighter. 

Flues asbestos lined and covered with steel plate. 

The gas section can be put on either side of coal section. When the gas section is to the right 
of the coal section a pouch feed can be used on the latter. The pouch feed is a great convenience when 
hard coal is used. 





CODE WORD 




No. 818G 


No. 820G 


Gas section on Right ..... 

Gas section on Right, with Pouch Feed 

Gas section on Left ..... 


Horn 
Pro Horn 
Hornman 


Host 
Pro Host 
Hostman 



32 



Upper 
Broiler 



Gas 
Water 
Heater 
in rear 





Special Range No. 23 



For soft coal, hard coal or wood. Weight, 600 lbs. Top cooking surface, 41x30^ inches. 
Oven, 23 inches wide, 23^ inches deep, and 16 inches high. 



Size 



23 

23 
23 
2j 
23 
23 



Description 



Hi^h Shelf 

High Shelf and Water Front. ... 
High Shelf and Flush Reservoir.. 

High Closet 

High Closet and Water Front. . . . 
High Closet and Flush Reservoir 



Arrangement of Top 



Six nine-inch 

holes and key 

piate 



Code Word 



Without Pouch Feed With Pouch Feed 



View 

View-ful 

Velt 

Van 

Van-full 

Vase 



Pro View 
Pro View-full 
Pro Velt 
Pro Van 
Pro Van-full 
Pro Vase 



This range is especially designed for boarding houses, small restaurants or other places where 
a large sized oven is required. Body of No. 16 gauge, cold rolled, double stretched steel. Fire-box 
same as in family range. Can be furnished with malleable lids, or very heavy cast lids. 



34 



Hotel Ranges and Kitchen Outfits 



WE have always felt that our customers should be as well prepared to equip hotel kitchens as to 
equip those of dwellings, and that they are as much entitled to the one class of trade as to the 
other. Our hotel goods are sold only through dealers, and we have made a large extra invest- 
ment and have incurred greaf*additional expense in placing this complete line on the market, because 
we want our customers to feel that they can not only supply cooking apparatus for family kitchens, but 
that they can also completely and splendidly equip the largest hotel, restaurant or public institution 
within their territory. 

Dealers lose a great deal of this business every year simply because they do not go after it. 
There is no reason why they should allow other range manufacturers who sell direct to hotels to come 
into their territory and capture this trade. Dealers have the advantage of being on the ground, and 
can undoubtedly secure the bulk of the hotel trade if they look after it. Our hotel ranges are of the 
same high standard as our family ranges, and there is no kitchen so large as to be beyond our capacity 
to equip. 

We recently installed in the kitchen of a public institution a range with cooking capacity for over 
one thousand persons, and not a day passes but that we assist our customers in securing hotel trade of 
some character. 

Dealers who will co-operate with us by keeping on the lookout for such orders will find that it will 
be but a short time before they will control this class of business in their territory. 

In this catalogue we illustrate our 23-inch and 30-inch oven hotel ranges in the one-section and 
two-section styles only, but these ranges can be furnished promptly with as many additional ovens and 
fire-boxes as desired, thus forming a range of any size and capacity. In erecting these sections, they 
are riveted together with strips of heavy steel plate, a most substantial joint, leaving each section so 
that it can be operated either independently of the others or in connection with the whole. 

We illustrate in the following pages the hotel and carving tables generally used, but as this class 
of work is almost always made from specifications, it will be well to send specifications to us when prices 
are desired. Prices for hanging racks, canopies, sand ovens, etc., will be quoted on request. We 
do not illustrate these goods because such appurtenances are always constructed to order from specifi- 
cations, but we can furnish anything of that sort promptly. 

We carry a complete line of hotel ware, copper steam-jacket kettles, Ashcroft jacket kettles 
vegetable steamers and roasting ovens, and we are prepared to furnish entire outfits for hotel kitchens 



35 



Description of Hotel Ranges 

BODY — No. 15 gauge, three-pass, cold-rolled, double-stretched steel. Oven body — No. 14 gauge, 
three-pass, cold-rolled, double-stretched steel plates, hand-riveted to malleable frames so as 
to provide air-tight construction and prevent fire-cracks. (See article on Ovens, page 8.) Oven 
bottoms — Non-warpable No. 10 gauge steel plates, riveted together. Positively will not buckle. Oven 
door — Very heavy malleable iron, supported by braces of same material. 

The oven door handle is made with a double catch, and has no spring about it to get out of repair. 
The catches are arranged with a second notch, so that the oven door can be left slightly open, to cool 
and ventilate. The handle is set out from the range, which keeps it from getting hot, and saves the 
hand from coming into contact with the oven when the door is let down. 

Ash-pan strongly bailed, with open end. 

Asbestos-lined end-flues, covered with heavy steel plate, same as on family ranges. (See page 8.) 

Malleable iron rim around the entire top. 

Hot-air flues surround the oven, preventing direct contact of water-front with oven. 

Nickeled panels and brackets, protecting bar and protecting bar-brackets. 

Our experience in the building of malleable ranges has enabled us to study the evolution of this 
type of range construction thoroughly, and to place on the market numerous constructive features 
which can be found in no other make. 

We employ none but experienced malleable range workers on our product, and we exercise the 
same care and supervision over all departments. 



Any hotel range can be equipped with 
galley top, for marine purposes. Because 
of their construction, our ranges are par- 
ticularly adapted to ranches and lumber 
camps. Hotel ranges should be set on 
brick, if practicable, or on zinc or other 
metal, to protect the floor. 



36 



Grate 

"HpHE MALLEABLE" diagonal grate for hotel ranges is constructed along the same general line 
-1 as the duplex grate for family ranges, and operates equally well with either hard coal, soft coal or 
wood. By one turn of the shaker to right or left, it can be adjusted for either fuel. Each grate 
revolves from its center, and a slight rotary motion removes all ashes and clinkers without dumping 
the fire. The grate bars are controlled by two small cogs meshed on outside of the fire-box, thus 
preventing clogging by ashes. 

Fire Linings 

The fire linings are made of the very best gray iron, 
in three sections, to prevent buckling. Being exception- 
ally heavy, they are particularly fitted to the severe 
usage of hotel work, and will withstand the most intense 
and continuous heat. 

Water- Front 

The water-fronts are made of malleable iron, and re- 
place the lining of fire-box. 

We test these fronts to 200 pounds pressure, and if 
properly connected they will not leak. 



Hotel water-fronts possess great heating capacity, and 
should not be connected to a boiler of less than seventy- 
five gallons capacity, in order to prevent noise caused 
by excessive boiling. Owing to the malleable iron con- 
struction of these water fronts, and because of the 
extreme pressure to which they are submitted before 
leaving our factory, it is manifest that they will stand the 
test of ordinary use without disclosing any weakness or defect. A water-front may become defective 
through freezing or through fire being started when the water-front is empty. Care should, there- 
fore, be exercised against these contingencies. See pages 26 and 28. 




37 



Hotel Range No. 923 

One Oven and One Fire-Box 

For soft coal, hard coal or wood. To be set with nine-inch pipe and not reduced. 



Size 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Arrangement of Top 


Weight 


Code Word 


923 


49^34% 


23 x 23% x 16 


Six nine-inch holes and key plate. . 


825 


Brick 


923 


49 x 34% 


23 x 23% x 16 


One hole anchor plate and reducing 
ring over fire, balance solid 


825 


Buck 


923 


49x34% 


23 x 23% x 16 


Two nine-inch holes over fire, bal- 
ance solid 


825 


Boom 









Always shipped with water-front, unless otherwise ordered. 

Extra charge for extension fire-box for 30-inch wood. 

Cut illustrates only one section of this range. As many additional ovens and fire-boxes as desired 
can be connected, making a range of any size and capacity. Sections are riveted together with strips of 
heavy steel plate. Construction is extra heavy throughout. 

This range can be furnished with a high closet instead of a high shelf, and can be equipped with 
a fifteen-gallon flush reservoir in which, as in the reservoir of our family range, the water is heated by 
direct contact. See page n. This reservoir is a great improvement over the old-fashioned open-top 
copper tank, connected to the water-front by pipes which are liable to fill with lime and burn out. 



Any hotel range can be equipped with 
galley top, for marine purposes. Because 
of their construction, our ranges are par- 
ticularly adapted to ranches and lumber 
camps. Hotel ranges should be set on 
brick, if practicable, or on zinc or other 
metal, to protect the floor. 



38 



t * 




ROC,£> 



Hotel Range No. 930 

One Oven and One Fire-Box 

For soft coal, hard coal or wood. To be set with nine-inch pipe and not reduced. 



Size 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven 


Arrangement of Top 


Weight 


Code Word 


930 
930 

930 


57 x 34^ 
57 x 34^ 

57 x 34^ 


30x 23% x 16 
30x 23% x 16 

30x23% x 16 


Eight nine-inch holes 

Two nine-inch holes over fire and 
balance solid 

Top solid, with one-hole anchor 
plate and reducing ring over fire. 


900 
900 
900 


Coon 
Clam 
Clew 



Always shipped with water-front unless otherwise ordered. 

Extra charge for extension fire-box for thirty-inch wood. 

Cut illustrates only one section of this range. As many additional ovens and fire-boxes as desired 
can be connected, making a range of any size or capacity. Sections are riveted together with strips of 
heavy steel plate. Construction is extra heavy throughout. 

This range can be furnished with a high closet instead of a high shelf, and can be equipped with 
a fifteen-gallon flush reservoir in which, as in the reservoir of our family range, the water is heated by 
direct contact. See page 11. This reservoir is a great improvement over the old-fashioned open-top 
copper tank, connected to the water-front by pipes which are liable to fill with lime and burn out. 



Any hotel range can be equipped with 
galley top, for marine purposes. Because 
of their construction, our ranges are par- 
ticularly adapted to ranches and lumber 
camps. Hotel ranges should be set on 
brick, if practicable, or on zinc or other 
metal, to protect the floor. 



40 



;/ ; -- : , ;; . . ' «" ' •• 7C?=-^ 




Romish 



Hotel Range No. 936 

Two Ovens and One Fire- Box 

For soft coal, hard coal, or wood. To be set with nine-inch pipe, and not reduced. 



Size 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Ovens, Each 


Arrangement of Top 


Weight 


Code Word 


936 


66^ x 34^ 
66^ x 34^ 
66^ x 34^ 


18 x 23^ x 13 
18 x 23^ x 13 
i8x 23^ x 13 


Two nine-inch holes over fire bal- 
ance solid 


1060 

1060 
1060 


Duke 


936 
936 


One hole over fire, with reducing 
Ten nine-inch holes 


Dove 
Dirk 







Always shipped with water-front, unless otherwise ordered. 

This range can be furnished with a high closet instead of a high shelf, and can be equipped 
with a fifteen-gallon flush reservoir, in which, as in the reservoir of our family range, the water is 
heated by direct contact. See page 11. This reservoir is a great improvement over the old-fashioned 
open-top copper tank, connected to water-front by pipes, which are liable to fill with lime and burn out. 



Regulating Damper 



Placed in pipe under the high shelf. 

All double-oven ranges are provided 
with cut-off dampers dividing the flue collar, 
so that one or both ovens can be used. Any 
desired temperature can be obtained in 
either oven by adjustment of this damper. 

With this damper, one oven can be operated full and the other used for warming-oven purposes. 




Any hotel range can be equipped with 
galley top, for marine purposes. Because 
of their construction, our ranges are par- 
ticularly adapted to ranches and lumber 
camps. Hotel ranges should be set on 
brick, if practicable, or on zinc or other 
metal, to protect the floor. 



42 



Hotel Range No. 940 



Two Ovens and One Fire-Box 

For soft coal, hard coal or wood. To be set with nine-inch pipe and not reduced. 



Size 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Ovens, each 


Arrangement of Top 


Weight 


Code Word 


940 


70>^X34^ 
70^X34^ 
70^X34^ 


20x23^ x 13 

20 X 23^ X I3 

20 X 23^ X 13 


Two nine-inch holes over fire, bal- 
ance solid :.. 


1150 
I I 50 
1150 


Edict 


940 


One hole over fire with reducing 
ring", balance solid 


Elk 


940 


' 

Ten nine-inch holes 


Earl 







Always shipped with water-front unless otherwise ordered. 

This range can be furnished with a high closet instead of a high shelf, and can be equipped 
with a fifteen-gallon flush reservoir in which, as in the reservoir of our family range, the water is 
heated by direct contact. See page 11. This reservoir is a great improvement over the old-fashioned 
open-top copper tank, connected to water front by pipes which are liable to fill with lime and burn out. 



Regulating Damper 



Placed in pipe under the high shelf. 

All double-oven ranges are provided 
with cut-off dampers dividing flue collar, so 
that one or both ovens can be used. Any 
desired temperature can be obtained in 
either oven by adjustment of this damper. 

With this damper one oven can be operated full and the other used for warming-oven purposes. 




Any hotel range can be equipped with 
galley top for marine purposes. Because 
of their construction, our ranges are par- 
ticularly adapted to ranches and lumber 
camps. Hotel ranges should be set on 
brick, if practicable, or on zinc or other 
metal, to protect the floor. 



44 



Hotel Range No. 946 

Two Ovens and Two Fire-Boxes 

For soft coal, hard coal, or wood. To be set with ten-inch pipe not reduced. 



Size 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Oven, each 


Arrangement of Top 


Weight 


Code Word 


946 


98x34^ 
98x34^ 

98x34^ 


23 x 23*^ x 16 
23 x 23^ x 16 

23 x 23^ x 16 


Six nine -inch holes and key plate 
on each section 


1650 

165O 
165O 


Brickman 


946 


One hole, anchor plate, and reduc- 
ing ring over fire, balance solid, on 
each section 


Buckman 


946 


Two nine-inch holes over fire, bal- 
ance solid, on each section 


Booman 



Always shipped with water-front, unless otherwise ordered. 

Extra charge for extension fire-box for thirty-inch wood. 

This range consists of two sections of No. 923, riveted together. Can be furnished with as many 
additional ovens and fire-boxes as desired, forming a range of any size and capacity. Sections are 
riveted together with strips of heavy steel plate. 

Can be equipped with secret flue, which takes the smoke out in rear instead of on top of range, 
giving more top surface and affording better draft. 



Any hotel range can be equipped with 
galley top, for marine purposes. Because 
of their construction, our ranges are par- 
ticularly adapted to ranches and lumber 
camps. Hotel ranges should be set on 
brick, if practicable, or on zinc or other 
metal, to protect the floor. 




Breeching for No. 946. 
Extra. 



46 



Hotel Range No. 960 



Two Ovens and Two Fire Boxes 



For soft coal, or wood. To be set with twelve-inch pipe and not reduced. 



Size 


Top Cooking- 
Surface 


Oven, each 


Arrangement of Top 


Weight 


Code Word 


960 
960 

960 


114X34^ 

114X34^ 

114X34^ 


30x 23^ x 16 

30 x 23^ X 16 

30x 23^ x 16 


Eightnine-inch holeson each section 

Two nine-inch holes over fire, and 
balance solid, on each section. . . 

Top solid, with one-hole anchor 
plate and reducing ring over 
fire, on each section 


00 00 00 
1— 1 1— 1 1—1 


Coonman 
Claman 

Clewman 









Always shipped with water-front, unless otherwise ordered. 

Extra charge for extension fire-box for thirty-inch wood. 

This range consists of two sections of No. 930, riveted together. Can be furnished with as many 
additional ovens and fire-boxes as desired, forming a range of any size or capacity. Sections are 
riveted together with strips of heavy steel plate. 

Can be equipped with secret flue, which takes the smoke out in rear instead of on top of range, 
giving more top surface and affording better draft. 



Any hotel range can be equipped with 
galley top, for marine purposes. Because 
of their construction, our ranges are par- 
ticularly adapted to ranches and lumber 
camps. Hotel ranges should be set on 
brick, if practicable, or on zinc or other 
metal, to protect the floor. 




Breeching for No. 960. 
Extra. 



48 



Center Range 



Six Ovens and Six Fire-Boxes 

For soft coal, hard coal or wood. To be set with eighteen-inch pipe and not reduced. 



Size 


Top Cooking 
Surface 


Ovens 


Description 


Weight 

6000 


Code Word 


23-6 


147 X9O 


23 x 23^ x 16 


Single shelf 


Zebra 







Made especially for places where a very large amount of cooking has to be done quickly. 

This illustration shows six fire-boxes, six 23-inch ovens, two large warming ovens, and single shelf. 
Can be built with 30-inch ovens or double shelf if desired. 



50 



jy w:. I ff ."- "v I ■■ ; 




Hotel Steam Table 



Ma 


de in two sizes. 


Can be connected to any of our hotel ranges. 






Top Surface 


Code Word 




Copper Vessels 


Tin Vessels 


*I90 

f200 


I?, x 24.14 


Fa rra 
Gold 


File 


40 V 2 x 26X- • • 


Gulf 



* One oblong five-gallon boiler, one two-gallon steamer, four four-gallon round boilers, one three- 
gallon steamer. 

t Two oblong seven-gallon boilers, two oblong three-and-one-half-gallon steamers, two five-gallon 
round boilers, two two-gallon round steamers, two five-gallon round boilers, three one-gallon round 
boilers. 

Trays lined with heavy tinned copper ; vessels best XXX tin ; lower closet with malleable iron 
frames and drop door ; heavy steel body ; riveted throughout. 

If preferred, this table can be furnished with legs instead of with steel base. 



52 




Carving Table No. 250 





Length 


Weight 


Code Word 


DESCRIPTION 


Tin Dishes 

and Covers for 

Meat Dishes 


Copper Dishes 

and Covers for 

Meat Dishes 


One oblong five - gallon boiler, one two - gallon 
steamer, four round four-gallon boilers, one three- 
gallon steamer 


8' 


430 


Inn 


Isle 







Made of heavy steel, lined throughout with heavy tinned copper. Vessels of XXX tin or plan- 
ished copper. Meat dishes of heavy tinned copper. Heated by pipes from stove, as illustrated, or can 
be connected with steam boiler. Made in larger size, when specified, and can be constructed without 
stove, when so ordered. 



53 




Charcoal Broilers 



SIZE 



18-inch 
24-inch 
36-inch 





Code Word 

Ark 
Ant 
Axe 



Open grate for coke, closed grate for charcoal, malleable iron gridiron, extended check and 
apron, bin below for coal, riveted throughout and lined with pure asbestos board. 

We have a complete department devoted to hotel kitchen outfits. Write for prices and 
catalogues. 

54 





Coffee and Tea Urns 



No. 2202 2 gallons 

No. 2203, .... 3 gallons 
No. 2204 4 gallons 



No. 2205 5 gallons 

No. 2206 6 gallons 



The urns of this series are suitable for boarding- 
houses, small restaurants, or any place where it 
is desired to have coffee fresh and ready to serve 
at any time. They have a single wall of eighteen- 
ounce copper, heavily tinned on the inside with 
pure block-tin. The outside is handsomely nickel- 
plated and finely finished. They are equipped with 
a cotton bag to hold ground coffee, and with gauge, 
thermometer, and one faucet, and are heated by 
either a vapor lamp or a small gasoline burner. 



No. 2002 2 gallons No. 2006 6 gallons 

No. 2003 3 gallons No. 2008 8 gallons 

No. 2004 4 gallons No. 2010 10 gallons 

No. 2005 5 gallons 

The urns of this series are intended for hotels, 
large restaurants, and those places where coffee, 
tea, and other hot beverages are served in quan- 
tities. They are made from extra heavy copper, 
and are nickel-plated and finely finished on the 
outside. 

They are fitted with a removable vitrified stone 
or block-tin reservoir, and are equipped with two 
gauges, one showing the amount of coffee in the 
reservoir, and the other the amount of water be- 
tween the reservoir and the outside shell. The 
coffee reservoir is entirely surrounded by water, in 
order to prevent the coffee from boiling, which 
would cause it to lose much of its natural flavor 
and strength. These urns are heated by either 
a steam coil or a large gasoline burner. 

We furnish this style urn of any capacity up to 
twenty-five gallons, and we also furnish them in 
batteries of two, three or five. 



55 



Directions for Setting Up and Operating "The Malleable" Range 

To insure the perfect operation of a range, the following points are of the first importance : 
i. That the flue stopper is in its place. 

2. That the chimney is clear and has a good draft at pipe hole. Many chimneys are made too 
low and draw better when a " smoke stack " is put on them. 

3. That the pipe fits closely on the range and in the chimney. No air should enter the flue 
around outside of pipe. 

4. That the pipe does not go too far into the chimney. 

5. That no ashes from the chimney get into the end of the pipe. 

6. That there are no pipe holes open on the opposite side of the chimney, either above or below, 
and that there is no unused stove with draft-slide open, connected with the same chimney. 

7. That the smoke pipe is not telescoped at the elbow. 

8. That 7-inch pipe is used in making connections, and that the opening to the flue where the 
range pipe enters is seven inches in diameter and never reduced. 

Ranges should always be set on a piece of zinc or other metal, to preserve the floor. 

When setting up a range, examine the flue and see that all holes are closed up except the one to 
which the range is to be connected. Place a lighted piece of paper in this hole, and if the blaze goes 
strongly up the chimney the flue is probably all right; if not, the flue is defective, and the cause must be 
located and corrected in order to obtain satisfactory results. (See article on flues and chimneys, page 57.) 



Directions for Building and Keeping Fire and 

Caring for Range 

Before starting to build a fire, free the grate from ashes. To do this, first put on the lids, close the 
front and end drafts and open the oven damper; then turn the grate, and the ashes will fall into the ash 
receiver. If these precautions are not followed, the ashes will fly over the room. Now turn the grate 
back into place and remove the lids from over the fire-box ; cover the grate with pieces of paper 
twisted in the center and left loose at the ends ; cover the paper with small sticks or pieces of pine wood, 
being sure that the wood reaches the ends of the fire-box, and that it is so arranged that air can pass 
freely between the sticks. Over the pine place hardwood sticks; then sprinkle with two shovelfuls of 
small coal. Put on the covers, open the closed end or front drafts, apply a lighted match under the 
grate — and you have a fire. 



56 



When the wood is thoroughly kindled, add more coal. A blue flame will soon appear, which is 
the coal gas burning to carbon dioxide, after which the flame becomes white ; then the oven damper 
should be closed. In a few moments the end or front draft may be nearly closed, leaving only enough 
space to admit sufficient oxygen to keep the fire alive. It is sometimes forgotten that oxygen is neces- 
sary to keep a fire burning. As soon as the coal is well ignited, half close the chimney damper, unless 
the draft is very poor. Regulate the fire with end of front draft, as desired. 

If fire is maintained continuously during the day, replenish with coal frequently, but in small 
quantities. If fire will not be needed for some hours, open the pipe-check and close the drafts. When 
fire is again wanted, close the check, open end or front draft, shake slightly, and wait for the fire to burn 
brightly before adding new coal. 

When coal is red hot it has parted with most of its heat. Some persons refuse to believe this, 
and insist upon keeping the dampers open until most of the heat has escaped into the chimney. 

To keep a fire over night, remove the ashes from under the fire, put on enough coal to fill the 
fire-box, close the end and front drafts, and open check draft in pipe. Should the fire burn out under 
this treatment, the draft is not checked enough. To check more, lift the back lids slightly, to admit air. 
This is better than lifting the lids over the fire-box, because the latter plan would permit poisonous 
gases to escape into the room. 

Never allow the fire-box to be more than three-fourths full. When it is full, the linings and top 
plates are injured, the draft is checked, a larger amount of fuel is consumed, and much heat is lost. 
This is a point that should be impressed on the mind of the cook. 

Ashes should be removed and sifted daily, and the sittings should be picked over so as to save 
the half-burned cinders, throwing out the useless clinkers. 

Never attempt to bake until the oven is hot, and while baking keep the oven door closed until 
such time as the baking should be done. 

Grease or garbage should never be thrown into the pouch feed or burned in the fire-box, as noth- 
ing destroys the texture and life of iron so quickly as the burning of grease or watery waste. 

The back flue, oven, top and bottom should be cleaned out through the clean-out door once a 
week. See that all flues are open and clear, so that the smoke can freely pass through them. Many 
do not clean the flues thoroughly, and frequently soot and ashes are pushed into back corners, in that 
way stopping them up. 

Rust can be removed from nickel by an application of ammonia, whiting and water, which should 
be applied when the range is cold. When nearly dry, polish with a soft rag. Aluminum can be cleaned 
with soap and water. 

The steel body can be cleaned with gasoline or turpentine. These should never be applied 
except when the range is cold. 

The range top and steel body can be preserved in their original condition by rubbing with a 
greasy rag once or twice a week. 



57 



a 



o = 



A 




B 



o 




- 











G 



Flues and Chimneys 



EVERY range requires more draft than an ordinary cook stove, because its flues are larger. No 
range or stove is provided with a draft. That must be furnished by the chimney. The taller the 
chimney the stronger the draft. A range can no more operate without a chimney than a steam 
engine can operate without a boiler. 

If a range fails to give satisfaction, it is either because it has been improperly set up, or because 
it is connected to a bad chimney. 

If a range fails to operate, the chimney should first be looked to for the remedy. 

There are more bad chimneys than good ones. 

Dealers should always ascertain the character and condition of the chimney before they put up a 
range; and they ought to know that a range cannot operate without a good chimney and suitable fuel, 
nor without being properly set up. 

As the range manufacturer builds neither the house nor the chimneys, he cannot be held responsi- 
ble for the operation of the range, seeing that a range cannot operate itself. It must have a good 
chimney, it must have a good fuel, and it must be properly set up, in order to do good work. Other- 
wise, it will fail, in which case the responsibility for the failure will be chargeable either to the chimney, 
to the fuel, or to the improper setting up of the range— not to the range itself. 

Each range or stove should have an entirely separate flue. The flue should not, under any cir- 
cumstances, run below the point where the pipe of the range enters the chimney, as a volume of cold, 
dead air below that point would chill the entire column of air in the chimney, and thus retard the draft. 
(See illustration A.) 

The remedy in such a case is to either fill the bottom of the flue with cement to within six inches 
of the lower side of the pipe hole, or to cut off the flue just below the pipe hole with a sheet-iron plate, 
the plate to be covered with several inches of ashes or cement, so as to make it air-tight. The result 
will be to apply the heat at the base of the flue, and a good draft will be obtained. See illustration A. 



58 



Any range being larger than an ordinary cook stove requires a larger flue. 

The flue for a range should be at least 9x9 inches, perfectly smooth upon the inside, and free 
from any mortar or bricks that may have fallen into it during construction. (See Illustration B.) To 
make certain that the flue is clear, a heavy weight may be let down by a rope and worked against the 
sides of the chimney. 

The opening to the flue where the range pipe enters should be seven inches in diameter, and 
should never be reduced. 

Complaint is sometimes made that a range will not operate, although the pipe is carefully fitted 
into a chimney that has a good draft and which has been in use for many years. Investigation usually 
proves that the range in question is connected to a chimney having a large, old-fashioned fire-place at 
its base. In such a case the fire-place must be cut off before the range will work well. (See Illustra- 
tion C.) 

If the kitchen chimney is much lower than the main part of the house, the wind in blowing over 
the roof may at times fall like water over a dam, descending almost perpendicularly on the top of the 
chimney, thus beating down the smoke contained therein and spoiling the draft. The remedy is to 
either build up the chimney or add a smoke stack to it reaching to a point higher than the main build- 
ing. (See Illustrations D and E.) 

An adjacent building or a large tree, if higher than the top of the chimney, may cause the wind 
to blow down the chimney flue and interfere with the draft in the same manner. This trouble can be 
remedied in the same way, by increasing the height of the chimney. 

When there is more than one opening into a chimney, a variety of complications may affect the 
draft ; therefore, see that all openings of whatever kind into the flue, except the hole you intend to use 
for the range pipe, are securely closed. 

A new or "green" chimney never provides a perfect draft until it is thoroughly dry, which some- 
times requires from two to four weeks' time. 

All chimneys should be finished at the top with a thin edge or with tile, the tile to be the full size 
of the flue. This minimizes the interference of wind with the draft. (See Illustration F.) 

In an old chimney, the mortar is sometimes found to have crumbled from between the bricks, so 
that air leaks into the chimney and spoils the draft. These cracks should be filled up. (See Illustra- 
tion G.) 

All the air that passes through the chimney should first pass through the fire, except what is used 
to check the draft. 



59 



List of Parts 



Order Parts by Number Only. 



No. 19^ A. 
No. 2oy 2 A. 
No. 2\y 2 A. 
No. 26y 2 A. 
No. 25^ A. 
No. 22^ A. 
No. 23 A. 
No. 30 A. 
No. 79 A. 
No. 2 A. 
No. 3 A. 
No. 73 A. 
No. 73^ A. 
No. 16-6 

No. 18-6 

No. 20-6 

No. 20-21 A. 
No. 20-23 A. 
No. 81 A. 
No. 15 A. 
No. 16 A. 
No. X 
No. 8-54 

No. 9-54 

No. 8-52 

No. 9-52 

No. 53 A. 



Fire Door. 

Fire Door Lining. 

Fire Door Panel. 

Front Draft Door. 

Front Draft Door Slide. 

Housing. 

Grate Lock. 

Ash Cup. 

Oven Door Handle. 

Damper. 

Damper Frame. 

Tea Shelf. 

Tea Shelf Hinge. 

Back Damper Rod, 16-inch oven 

Range. 
Back Damper Rod, 18-inch oven 

Range. 
Back Damper Rod, 20-inch oven 

Range. 
Side Damper Rod, No. 8 Range. 
Side Damper Rod, No. 9 Range. 
Caps for Water-Front holes. 
Clean-out Door. 
Clean-out Door Hinge. 
Shaker for all Grates. 
Back Section Right-hand Lining, 

No. 8 Range. 
Back Section Right-hand Lining, 

No. 9 Range. 
Front Section Right-hand Lining, 

No. 8 Range. 
Front Section Right-hand Lining, 

No. 9 Range. 
Middle Section Right-hand Lining, 

all Family Ranges (two to each 

range.) 



No. 55 A. 
No. 50^ A. 

No. 51 MA. 
No. 9-58^ 

No. 64 A. 
No. 57 A. 

No. 61 A. 
No. 8-64 
No. 9-64 
No 8 A.R. 
No. 8 A.L. 
No. 33 A. 
No. 34 A. 
No. 74 A. 
No. 74^ A. 
No. 8-58 P. 

No. 9-58 P. 

No. 59^ P. 

No. 56-F. 
No. 56-C. 
No. 56-B. 
No. 1 1 -A. 

No. 55A.W. 

No. 56^ A. 



Lining, All Family- 
Lining, All Family 
Lining, All Family 



Back End 

Ranges. 
Front End 

Ranges. 
Hard Coal 

Ranges. 
Extension for Left-hand and Pouch 

Feed Lining, No. 9 Range. 
Cog Wheels, All Family Ranges. 
Center for Left-hand Lining, All 

Family Ranges 
Water-Heater for High Reservoir. 
Anchor for Lining, No. 8 Range. 
Anchor for Lining, No. 9 Range. 
Right-hand Protecting Bar Bracket. 
Left-hand Protecting Bar Bracket. 
End Draft. 
End Draft Slide. 
Pipe Check Draft. 
Pipe Check Draft Slide. 
Extension for Pouch Feed Water 

Front, No. 8. 
Extension for Pouch Feed Water 

Front, No. 9. 
Back Rest for all Pouch Feed Water 

Fronts. 
Front Section Pouch Feed Lining. 
Middle Section Pouch Feed Lining. 
Back Section Pouch Feed Lining. 
Oven Door Stake 

Flush Reservoir Pocket Complete. 
Wood End Lining, for all Family 

Ranges. 
Frame of Left-hand Lining, All 

Family Ranges. 



60 









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3*7^ )■ 









ft-*. 



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■~s~s*>y 



&J^ r 9^ 




%C J€A 3j£ 






JX/ 



?£/ 



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MU 




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Ot% .4' 




..■?•.•■: r,-v... 



List of Parts — Continued 



Order Parts by Number Only. 



No. 8-16F.P. 
No. 8-18F.P. 
No. 9-16F.P. 
No. 9-18 F.P. 
No. 35 A. 
No. 65 A. 
No. 71 A. 
No. 72 A. 
No. 18 P. 
No. 19 P. 

No. i 9 y 2 p. 

No. 70 A. 
No. 66 A. 
No. 36 A.R. 
No. 36 A.L. 

No. 8-63 R. 
No. 9-63 R. 
No. 8-63 L. 
No. 9-63 L. 



French Plate, No. 816 Range. No. 8-62 

French Plate, No. 818 Range. No. 9-62 

French Plate, No. 916 Range. No. 69 A. 

French Plate, No. 918 Range. No. 68 A. 

End Shelf. No. 6S l / 2 A. 

Elevated Reservoir Bracket. No. 8-C 

Flush Reservoir Top. No. 9-C 

Lid for Flush Reservoir. No. 8-16 

Pouch Feed. No. 8-18 

Pouch Feed Door. No 8-20 

Pouch Feed Door Slide. No. 9-18 
Flush Reservoir Rest. 

High Reservoir Rest. No. 9-20 

Shelf Bracket, right. No. 8-16 B. 

Shelf Bracket, left. No. 8-18 B. 

Right-hand Grate Bar, No. 8 Range. No. 8-20 B. 

Right-hand Grate Bar, No. 9 Range. No. 9-18 B. 
Left-hand Grate Bar, No. 8 Range. 

Left-hand Grate Bar, No. 9 Range. No. 9-20 B. 



Grate Bed for No. 8 Range. 
Grate Bed for No. 9 Range. 
Back Bracket for Flush Reservoir. 
Front Bracket for Flush Reservoir. 
Panel for Flush Reservoir Bracket. 
Short Center, No. 8 Range. 
Short Center, No. 9 Range. 
Open Anchor Plate, No. 816 Range. 
Open Anchor Plate, No. 818 Range. 
Open Anchor Plate, No. 820 Range. 
Open Anchor Plate, Nos. 916 and 

918 Ranges. 
Open Anchor Plate, No. 920 Range. 
Closed Anchor Plate, No. 8 16 Range. 
Closed Anchor Plate,No.8i8 Range. 
Closed Anchor Plate, N0.820 Range. 
Closed Anchor Plate, Nos. 916 and 

918 Ranges. 
Closed Anchor Plate, No. 920 Range. 



62 




Comwr 'Ctir. 



Terms 

All bills are due three months from date of invoice. Five per cent discount is 
allowed for cash, if paid within thirty days from date of invoice. 

Interest will be charged on all past due accounts. 

All bills are payable in New York or Chicago par funds, without allowance for 
exchange or express charges. 

In case the purchaser shall sell out or assign his stock in trade (or if the same 
shall become incumbered in anyway), or become financially involved, the account 
shall become due and payable forthwith. 

Accounts not paid at maturity are subject to sight draft with exchange, without 
notice. 

All claims for reduction must be made within five days from receipt of goods. 

All repair items, kitchenware and extras are net cash. 



Shipments 



If not otherwise advised, we ship all ranges, etc., at owners' risk, thus saving 
our customers the difference between one and one-half times first-class rates of freight 
and much lower rates. 

Our responsibility as shippers ceases upon our delivering goods in good order 
to carrier and mailing receipt therefor to consignee ; and the carrier alone is responsible 
to consignee for all damages sustained by breakage, shortage, or delay in transporta- 
tion. Every assistance in our power will be cheerfully rendered in case it becomes 
necessary to trace lost goods or to collect damages ; but in no instance shall the set- 
tlement with us be subject to the arrival or non-arrival of goods at their place of des- 
tination, or to claims for damages to goods in transit. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




016 066 249 9 £